Broadband in India and abroad.

Harshad Joshi hates waiting on a site for too long

If by any chance you have encountered this image on some other site for more then 40 seconds, then you know that you are not using Broadband to access that particular site.

Broadband is often called high-speed Internet, because it usually has a high rate of data. In general, any connection to the customer of 256 kbit/s (0.256 Mbit/s) or more is considered broadband Internet. The International Telecommunication Union Standardization Sector (ITU-T) recommendation I.113 has defined broadband as a transmission capacity that is faster than primary rate ISDN, at 1.5 to 2 Mbit/s. The FCC definition of broadband is 200 kbit/s (0.2 Mbit/s) in one direction, and advanced broadband is at least 200 kbit/s in both directions. The OECD has defined broadband as 256 kbit/s in at least one direction and this bit rate is the most common baseline that is marketed as “broadband” around the world. There is no specific bitrate defined by the industry, however, and “broadband” can mean lower-bitrate transmission methods. Some Internet Service Providers (ISPs) use this to their advantage in marketing lower-bitrate connections as broadband.

In practice, the advertised bandwidth is not always reliably available to the customer; ISPs often allow a greater number of subscribers than their backbone connection can handle, under the assumption that most users will not be using their full connection capacity very frequently. This aggregation strategy works more often than not, so users can typically burst to their full bandwidth most of the time; however, peer-to-peer file sharing systems, often requiring extended durations of high bandwidth, stress these assumptions, and can cause major problems for ISPs who have excessively overbooked their capacity. As takeup for these introductory products increases, telcos are starting to offer higher bit rate services. For existing connections, this most of the time simply involves reconfiguring the existing equipment at each end of the connection.

As the bandwidth delivered to end-users increases, the market expects that video on demand services streamed over the Internet will become more popular, though at the present time such services generally require specialised networks. The data rates on most broadband services still do not suffice to provide good quality video, as MPEG-2 quality video requires about 6 Mbit/s for good results. Adequate video for some purposes becomes possible at lower data rates, with rates of 768 kbit/s and 384 kbit/s used for some video conferencing applications. The MPEG-4 format delivers high-quality video at 2 Mbit/s, at the high end of cable modem and ADSL performance.

India has created a mobile revolution, but now, we are waiting for yet another broadband revolution that will help in faster communication and easy sharing of information at a rapid speed. As time progresses, we will definately feel the need of fast internet access due to following reasons.

1. The paradigm change from ‘fixed’ desktop apps to ‘live’ and usable ‘online widgets. Many sites like Google and Yahoo! have got various useful services and widgets that can be utilized efficiently only on a relatively fast net access. Most importantly, these apps are available at a cost of 0 rs. Money saved is money earned.

2. Conventional media services have proven inefficient and unsufficient to reach the masses, only radios have succeded, but the time taken to do so is very slow and a radio service has got very few VAS. To reach more people at a time and enable to them to have a multiple way of communication is another advantage of broadband. We see that todays media is only a ‘one-way’ information transfer system. You can listen, but you cannot ‘talk’

3. Financial institutes like banks, stock markets, etc will recieve a boost and will enchance their capability.

4. Broadband will also help to spread education and at the same time, will help in reducing the digital divide and economical rift between the various levels of society.

Its very brief, but I think that all readers of this blog will agree that India needs more broadband services as compared with abroad.